Advent is a Season of Hope and Anticipation 
 
SIMBANG GABI COMMITEE   COORDINATORS AND MEMBERS
 
SPIRITUAL ADVISER
Rev. Renier Siva
 
OVER-ALL CHAIRMAN
Phoebe Fernandez
707-456-7310
stjv.events@gmail.com
 
 CO-CHAIRMAN
 Ella Fontamillas
707-980-2942
noellaneal@yahoo.com 
 
COMMUNICATION & FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS/PROGRAM COMMITTEE
Edith Tremethick – LEAD
 707-685-2072
etremethick@gmail.com
Lorna Villacampa – ASST
nlvillacampa@comcast.net
 
MUSIC MINISTRY
Rolly & Becky DelaCruz – LEAD
rollybecky@aol.com
 
PIANIST
Shiela Saromo -ASST
 
SOLOIST
Isabella Villacampa, Lorna Villacampa
Sam Pangalinan, Ed Samulde, Anna Butcher,
Ariel Crisostomo 
 
GUITARIST
Rolly DelaCruz, Ron Aruejo, Ed Jimenez,
Vic Lunasco
 
CHOIR
Rubie Ann Lardizabal,, Florinda Adriano
Rodel Catacutan, My Catacutan,
Irish Samulde, Cely Saromo
Aileen Baker, Amy Ofamen
 
SLIDE PROJECTOR PERSON
Rubie Ann Lardizabal –  LEAD
EVENT AND DECORATION COMMITTEE
Donnabell Saddi – LEAD
Charlotte Crisostomo  – ASST. 
Amor Daugherty, Anne Wong, Lanie Thomas, Kate Butcher, Framer Ofamen,  Ella Fontamillas, Virna Concepcion, Virgilyn Cervantes, Rubie Ann Lardizabal
 
FOOD COMMITEE
My Catacutan – LEAD
mydarlincatacutan@yahoo.com
Tess Deguzman – ASST
Ven Deguzman, Flor Aruejo, Rubie Ann Lardizabal, Conchita Delacruz, Carlos Delacruz, Mary Lee Alcantara, Lanie Thomas, Cely Saromo, Alieda Basa, (from Spanish Group),
 
LITURGY COMMITTEE
Pat Chavez – LEAD
Sherryl Oliva Groves – ASST for Altar Servers
Nati Lapurga – ASST for Lectors
 
 
SACRISTAN
Pat Chavez, Gail Grimm, Tonya Salas, Audrey Weiand, Clare Huston, Aleida Basa, Paz White
 
 
LECTORS

Sherryl Oliva Groves,  Nati Lapurga, Ron Drinkard, Jose Mendoza, Terri Bawner, Alice Quinn, Fred Dazo, Clara Montes, Virginia Salonga-Paulino Robbin Chaney, Theresa Matusick.

 
EXTRA-ORDINARY MINISTERS
OF THE HOLY EUCHARIST

Dennis Tremethick, Edith Tremethick, Fred Dazo, Victoria Dazo, Don Fernandez, Phoebe Fernandez, Natali Chun, Hermes Labrague, Estella Casino  Fred Salas, Ellen Jimenez, Ed Jimenez, Leslie Maligaya.

 

ALTAR SERVERS
Sherryl Oliva Groves – LEAD 
Neal Fontamillas, Jordan Groves, Michael Groves, Jaylan Catacutan, Liana Basa, Anna Butcher, Ellison Domingo, Sophia Chun, Cecilia “Cici” Abiva, Nathan Garnet, Noah Salas, & Eljay Jimenez
 
USHERS
Sid Reyes – LEAD
 707-688-1176
Carmen Walker, Noel Fontamillas, Paul Pagarigan
 
GIFT BEARERS
Sponsor of the Day
Nelson & Lorna Villacampa, Ven & Tess Deguzman, Hermes Labrague
 
Committees (Assigned)
 

 

==========================
 
OFFICIATING PRIESTS
CELEBRANTS/CO-CELEBRANTS
*Dec 15th – Rev. Cormac Lacre
*Dec 16th – Rev. Resti Galang
*Dec 17th – Rev. Rey Bersabal
*Dec 18th – Rev. Pete Manilag
*Dec 19th – Rev.Renier Siva
*Dec 20th – Auxiliary Bishop Myron Cotta
*Dec 21th – Rev. Eric Flores
*Dec 22nd – Rev. Jovito Rata
*Dec 23rd – Rev. Cesar Ageas
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What is Simbang Gabi?

Literally means “evening or night Mass.” As a devotional practice, it refers to the Philippine Catholic tradition of the novena, a series of nine evening Masses usually celebrated during Advent from Dec. 15-23, in preparation for Christmas Day. (In the Philippines, the dates are from Dec. 16-24, since Simbang Gabi is held in the early morning. Here in the U.S., the practice of the Simbang Gabi has been adapted to local conditions, with the Mass being moved to the evening hours for practical reasons.)
 

How did Simbang Gabi originate?

Simbang Gabi originated from the Missa Aurea (golden Mass or angel’s Mass) practiced by the Roman Catholic Church. This tradition was introduced by the Spanish friars at the start of the Catholic evangelization of the Philippine islands. In 1587, Friar Diego de Soria petitioned Pope Sixtus V for permission to have the Masses outdoors because the churches were too small to accommodate the crowds. The request was granted, and in the 17th century, the Simbang Gabi, or Misa de Gallo or Misa de Aguinaldo as it is variously referred to by the Catholic populace in the Philippines, became a permanent practice among Philippine Catholics. Also included in the indult granted by the pope was permission during the Mass to sing the Gloria and to wear white vestments to emphasize the joyful
anticipation of the coming of the Infant Savior in Bethlehem.
 

How is Simbang Gabi celebrated?

Originally, and the way it is still celebrated in most places in the Philippines, the Simbang Gabi Masses were held in the early hours of the morning at 4 a.m. or 5 a.m., when roosters crowed to announce the dawning of a new day, thus the name Misa de Gallo. This time of the day was chosen because most of the Filipino families were farmers and fishermen who either began or ended their day at daybreak. Farmers began working in their fields early to avoid the intense heat, while the fishermen who spent all night at sea came home in the early morning to sell their catch. At the first sign of dawn, local bands would start playing traditional Christmas carols around the town, and church bells would ring to summon everyone to the Simbang Gabi. Families walked to Mass passing by homes with flickering candles inside parols (star-shaped lanterns fashioned out of bamboo and colored paper to form a three-dimensional star in which a light bulb or candle is placed so it may glow as a symbol of the Christmas star of Bethlehem: “And behold, the star that they had seen at its rising preceded them, until it came and stopped over the place where the child was” Matthew 2:9b). Main features of the Mass were hymns and culturally expressive rituals and symbols, with star-shaped parols carried in procession and prominently displayed during Mass. After Mass, families and friends enjoyed the native delicacies spread out on the grounds around the church, strengthening social and spiritual ties within the community.
 

What does Simbang Gabi celebrate?

By the time of the Simbang Gabi, the somber waiting at the beginning of Advent turns into an eager and joyful longing for the coming of the Savior during the final nine days of Advent. This is best expressed by a Simbang Gabi ritual within the Mass when children process to the altar accompanied by an Advent song while bringing an offering of an empty manger, mantle, vigil candles, and flowers. This ritual symbolizes what is at the heart of the Advent season, humbly trusting and joyfully waiting for the arrival of the promised Savior. In the darkness of the night, all sing with joyful longing for the coming of the Savior who is the light of the world. Renew in all hearts the love of God and neighbor which is the true sign of your kingdom come!
 

Why is Simbang Gabi significant?

These are some reasons given by Filipino-Americans and those who are not. First, and foremost, it is a way for people to offer God worship and praise. Second, it is a way to express and develop personal spirituality by preparing the heart for the coming (Advent) of Christ at Christmas. Third, every nationality has developed religious customs and traditions they have brought and shared in America, thus adding another choice among religious practices for personal enrichment. Fourth, it is a way to develop community through a common effort of prayer, work, celebration, fellowship, and charity. Fifth, it helps maintain connections and unity with a country of origin – perhaps nostalgia for some – where the same practices are occurring at the same time in families and communities of origin.
 

How huge is Simbang Gabi?

This nine-day celebration symbolizes God’s desire to be human and the Filipino’s joy for that humanness. These are festive celebrations with Christmas carols sung before Mass, faith sharing, and, of course, lots of food afterward – a sample of Filipino food and refreshments is usually served at a reception following Mass. People dress in their finest Philippine barongs and dresses. Simbang Gabi is a religious festival for all, Filipino and non-Filipino. But no matter the language or dress, when you pray and sing during the Simbang Gabi, you realize how truly universal the Christmas spirit is. This is one of many cultural activities everyone can participate in and enjoy as a preparation for Christmas.
 
 

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FOOD SPONSORS OF THE DAY
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
15-Dec – Thursday – Simbang Gabi Core Group
16-Dec – Friday – Martha’s, God’s Helping Hand and Hospitality Ministries
17 Dec – Saturday – Mary Lee, Conchita Dela Cruz, Lori Delos Reyes
18 Dec – Sunday – Rubie Lardizabal + other families
19 Dec – Monday – Couples For Christ Ministry
20 Dec – Tuesday – Notre Dame School Parents and Friends
21 Dec – Wednesday – Rolly & Becky Delacruz, Lory Delos Reyes & Amy Ofamen
22 Dec – Thursday – Spanish Community
23 Dec – Friday – Potluck
Coffee – 20 and 23 Dec – c/o Sheryl Groves
 
All attendees are welcome to bring and share their favorite Filipino Dish/Dessert
 
“Festival Of Lights Parade”
 
FRIDAY, 23 DECEMBER
Right after the last day of the Novena/Mass we will have a Festival of Lights Parade from Church to the Parish Hall. We will then select 3 winners. Three Best “Parols” Christmas Lanterns will win prizes. It’s going to be a Potluck!  Please bring your favorite Dish to share. A Blessed Christmas to all!
 
NOTES:
SG will provide
Plates
Spoons & Forks
Napkins
Bowls
Bottled water
 
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parol-lantern-making-workshop-dec-4

“PAROL” LANTERN-WORKSHOP PHOTOS

FIRST DAY FOR SIMBANG GABI
SECOND DAY OF SIMBANG GABI
THIRD DAY OF SIMBANG GABI